messier object


the first science fiction novel i remember reading

This eluded me for years, what it was called.  It wasn’t this edition, though, but a library edition of the original hardback with the blue cover – on the lower left.

The part I remembered best was the part where they fly around the space station on giant pogo sticks. And where they meet old people who grow huge in space. One of those is an exaggeration, but which? Also I really don't think it was dangerous at all. I mean, they sent a kid up there for a quiz-show prize.

Thanks, parochial school library’s lack of attention to weeding!  You made me what I am today, kinda.

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dragon innit

IF IT HAS A DRAGON IN IT IT ISN’T SCIENCE FICTION! THE SOLE DIFFERENTIATOR BETWEEN FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION IS THE PRESENCE OR ABSENCE OF DRAGONS!



Jan’s Atomic Heart (АТОМНОЕ СЕРДЦЕ ЯНА)

Jan’s Atomic Heart (АТОМНОЕ СЕРДЦЕ ЯНА)
by Simon Roy
New Reliable Press, 2009

Frankfurt.
Some time in the far-ish future.

For a science fiction graphic novel set in the distant future, the world of Jan’s Atomic Heart seems surprisingly like our own: the moon may be colonized and people may telecommute as robots, but they still jog, go to egg restaurants, and drink lukewarm coffee.  While it obviously takes design cues from classic cyberpunk sequential art like Ghost in the Shell, the world Roy imagines is different from the Gibsonian dystopias of infinite darkness and a neon light flashing in a human face, forever.  It’s not steampunk, or biopunk, or magickpunk, it’s… normalpunk. (Please, kill me now.)  For all technology has changed, it doesn’t seem to have changed Jan, the titular human waiting for a new body after a car crash teleprojecting into an old android, his mysterious friend, Anders, or the society they find themselves living in. Continue reading



sharpenin’ stones, walkin’ on coals

The following are excerpts from a recent conversation I had on GTalk with a friend from high school.

jeff:
hey nellis which is more important, as a businessman in the field:
google or digg

nellis:
Google

jeff:
followup: which will be more important in ten years

nellis:
Unless everything goes horribly wrong Google

jeff:
yeah that’s about what i thought

nellis:
Although in all honesty they might both not exist

jeff:
that’s true i suppose too

nellis:
Google probably won’t go anywhere though

jeff:
but which will be more important on the internet, smart searches or community search recommendation whatever

nellis:
Google I imagine

jeff:
yeah
i think this museum blog i’m reading is really overselling social content

nellis:
It is affected by recentism

jeff:
yes
but even in that i feel like they use facebook or whatever far more than i do
i will admit i do not use digg/reddit because they are usually useless and stumbleupon because the interface is terrible but even then i don’t think i feel a need to

nellis:
Yeah I mean honestly
Whenever I am bored enough to want something interesting
I still go to Fark
Fuck all this web 2.0

jeff:
yeah
haha man fark
i have not been there in ages
i mean i basically use a few forums for the same purpose
but none of this drop-down flash applet gradient shaded bullshit

nellis:
Ha
I hear you
Continue reading